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Maker Business: Where to Sell Handmade Items Online

Young female maker in store to sell handmade items online

At one time, Etsy was the go-to place to sell your handmade items and vintage finds, and the site still offers a lot of exposure, but the sales giant isn’t your only option. When Etsy began letting in resellers and those with more varied types of items, it became a lot more difficult for creators to sell on the site.

While an Etsy store is still a viable option, savvy artisans are looking elsewhere. Consider one or more of these Etsy alternatives to sell your own handmade creations.

Maker Business: Where to Sell Handmade Items Online?

Aftcra: If you’re located in the USA, then Aftcra may be the right marketplace for you. This site is like an old-school Etsy and keeps resellers out of the market. You’ll pay seven percent on your sold items, but have no upfront fees or costs.

Handmade at Amazon: Amazon has cornered the market on everything from clothing to digital media, and handmade items are no exception. There is a monthly fee for listing, but Handmade at Amazon can get your product in the hands of buyers in a hurry. You’ll need to apply and be accepted and only handmade items are allowed on Amazon’s growing imprint.

ArtFire: One of Etsy’s longest lived and most vigorous competitors, ArtFire offers sellers several options, including individual listings and actual online stores. The site has traffic of over seven million shoppers each year and allows you to easily create a branded online presence.

Big Cartel: Already have a web design background or comfort with HTML? Then Big Cartel could be the right spot for you. You’ll be able to highlight up to 300 products each month and pay a flat rate of $9.99-$29.99 per month.

Bonanza: This site makes it easy to duplicate your efforts on eBay, Etsy or Amazon, since it allows you to rapidly import your listing. Fees are charged based on what you sell, making it an easy way to expand your marketing without a lot of overhead.

Craft is Art: Low costs, easy listing and an established web presence make Craft is Art a good match for your handmade products. The site originally focused on fashion accessories and jewelry, but has branched out in recent years.

DaWanda: Want to conquer the international marketplace? DaWanda allows you to expand your audience and post listings in French, German, Dutch and more. If you are fluent in a second language and want to expand your customer base, DaWanda can help make it happen.

Shopify: If you want a store to call your own and a robust addition to your existing website, Shopify can help. This site is ideal for more established brands and can complement your existing efforts; using a Shopify site also means you have control over how your site looks and feels to visitors.

Storenvy: With over 40,000 sellers showcasing handmade items, this curated site works like a social network. You’re rewarded for activity and could be featured on the sites busy front page if your network is active enough. If you sell popular items or have a large following, Storenvy can help you convert followers into buyers.

Expanding your marketing efforts beyond Etsy can help you locate new customers and ensure your handmade items are in front of a wide audience of potential buyers. By trying one or more Etsy alternatives, you can easily expand your prospect base, boost your brand awareness and even find more opportunities for showcasing your products.


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